02 October 2014

Today's Successful Business Must Be Remarkable

Business trends for 2013 show that businesses would begin to strive to be “remarkable.” Because the economy has evened out quality and pricing in products, the basis for the prediction was that consumers are looking for the extras that companies provide. According to experts, consumers look for companies with which they can identify. These are businesses that arouse interest, spur comment and get talked about in a positive way. They are, in short, remarkable.

How do you create a remarkable business today? To answer that question, you should think about the remarkable people you know. What makes them memorable? Passion is probably high on the list of characteristics you note. Others are creativity, originality and the willingness to go the extra mile. Those are all characteristics of remarkable businesses, too.

Branding is important. Remarkable businesses brand themselves not only in their product line but in their community involvement and outlook. Some remarkable businesses focus on being “green” companies. Others partner with health organizations or food banks to impact the communities where they are located. The services a company offers or the price that it charges may be standard. What “brands” the company is the personality of its leadership (think of the used car dealership advertisements with the salespeople in ball hats or Stetsons) and its image in the community.

People talk about businesses that go out of their way to help them find the product or service they need, even if it is only provided by a competitor. Consider the case of the insurance company that lists its premiums along with the costs of other companies, so consumers can see when they aren’t the cheapest.

Remarkable companies build an image and a corporate conscience and don’t deviate from it. They don’t settle for second best, and they keep positive outlooks. They build relationships with communities and consumers that keep them competitive. Most companies cannot match international corporations in production volume or in capital. They can, however, beat the “big boys” locally by leaning on those relationships.

Remarkable companies keep their strategies simple. They know what they are good at, and they concentrate on those areas. Remarkable businesses have a personality and a voice that comes through in their blogs and websites. It also is evident in the “handshakes” of their employees.

That last trait of remarkable businesses is important. Remarkable companies choose remarkable employees. Glen Gonzalez has been exceptional from the beginning of his career. His experience, though varied, bears the hallmarks of being remarkable. He has shown a willingness to go “the extra mile,” and has branded himself in both his cities of residence as someone with community ties who cares about things like preservation of art and culture.

The 2012 prediction that successful businesses would have to be remarkable businesses is not dated. It is on track in its assessment that products and services are becoming standardized and what sets successful companies apart is being “remarkable.” That means choosing people to operate the business who understand conscience and commitment: remarkable people build remarkable businesses.

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